9816552595_0769576369_stylesheet

How to get domain-specific user stylesheets in Epiphany

Epiphany isn’t really at the top of my browser list. I guess I should say ‘Web’ as it’s now called but a) nobody can google that and b) if you open the Gnome acitivities overview and type web you still get Firefox first (quick tip: type ‘epi’ and you’ll get it). Still, it has a nice interface that fits right into GNOME and it does come with basics amenities, like adblocking and a somewhat rudimentary user style sheet support.

Sadly, this is no Stylish replacement. You simply type rules in one after the other with no specification of where to apply them and where not to. So if you want to get rid of the #rightcolumn on site A but not the similarly named #rightcolumn on site B you’re out of luck. Well, you can of course jump through hoops, specifying site specific hierarchies and nesting.  Not exactly an nice solution. Here’s one I like better.

(more…)

These go to 11

The PulseAudio daemon has the ability to set it’s niceness level after launch. This can be helpful if the process isn’t prioritised properly and sound cuts out now and again. The man page states:

nice-level= The nice level to acquire for the daemon, if  high-priority is  enabled.  Note:  on  some  distributions  X11  uses -10 by default. Defaults to -11.

Which makes sense, right? It’s one more, right. It’s not ten, it’s eleven. If you need that extra push, put it up to eleven. So that it gets a little more priority than the default process.

Oh come on, Lennart, that has to be a Spinal Tap joke, right?

Clouds and Boxes

Get up on my cloud: What to consider when choosing private cloud software applications

Getting off of the corporation cloud and onto your own, self-hosted, open source-based is an arduous task. We use a lot of web based services these days and replacing each and every of them, one by one, requires some forethought so that you don’t move all your data over to something that simply does not work for you.

I have currently setup some 10+ web applications on my private cloud. I could make a list of them and explain why they’re the best available in their respective categories but I think it would be more helpful to suggest some guidelines when looking for your next selfhosted web application.

(more…)

No Title

No Title: Working around the missing –title parameter in Gnome Terminal

About a year ago the Gnome developers took away the option to run Gnome terminal with the –title parameter. This allowed you to give the terminal window a custom name like ‘SSH@MYBOX’ or ‘myProject’ instead of just ‘Terminal’. Why did they do that? I don’t know. It seems to just be what Gnome developers do these days.

If you prefer separate terminal windows for separate tasks, naming those windows is a nice way to tell them apart. This applies to general orientation (i.e. looking at the windows in the Activities overview and deciding which one to click on) and for scripting purposes (i.e. writing a script targets windows by title).

For me personally this latter option is the more important. I have a local terminal and a remote terminal and I would like be able to access either quickly and easily with a simple keyboard shortcut rather than mucking about with tabs. Here I will detail a way to accomplish that without the missing –title parameter.

(more…)