Running Kodi as a pure client on linux

When I got rid of the last Windows partition on any of my home computers, I thought I would finally give NFS a chance to replace CIFS as the reigning network file system in my house. To it’s credit, NFS took that chance and ran with it and it’s worked pretty much flawlessly ever since. Seeing how reliable it has been, it has become my primary means of accessing media located on my HTPC when not in front of/within earshot of the my TV/hifi but still on the local network.

That approach, however, has some serious shortcomings. I can’t see what I have and have not watched. I can’t see if I’m halfway through a movie – something that is depressingly common in this ADD world of media abundance. I have to move between file managers and video players, something that isn’t that practical when my 2-in-1 laptop is in a position that hides away the keyboard and I have to rely on the touch screen. And I find myself missing the inviting presentation of Kodi from my HTPC.

So recently the thought struck me: Could I not just set up a second Kodi instance on my linux laptop only as a client? Turn a full-fledged Kodi application into a dumb terminal? An… *makes sign of the cross* ‘app’? Only then I did I remember that, wait, wasn’t that sort of the selling point of Plex over Kodi? Apps aplenty? Streaming everywhere and anywhere? Well, yes. But it can be done with Kodi. Sort of. Here’s what I got.

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Get up on my cloud: What to consider when choosing private cloud software applications

Getting off of the corporation cloud and onto your own, self-hosted, open source-based is an arduous task. We use a lot of web based services these days and replacing each and every of them, one by one, requires some forethought so that you don’t move all your data over to something that simply does not work for you.

I have currently setup some 10+ web applications on my private cloud. I could make a list of them and explain why they’re the best available in their respective categories but I think it would be more helpful to suggest some guidelines when looking for your next selfhosted web application.

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My amazing aluminium lunchbox: Using a NUC5i3 as HTPC, web server, cloud server and living room gaming PC

I never did buy that Intel NUC D34010WYKH, the home server upgrade that I recognised some two months back was a completely frivolous investment. I didn’t buy it because I bought the new 2015 Broadwell-based model instead. All told I spent 5000 DKR (~€670/$750) on the thing plus components and accessories. So let’s get to the point: Is it just as ridiculous and frivolous a waste of hard-earned cash as I said it would be? Yes, it is. Do I regret it? No, I don’t. Not one bit.

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Why I desperately require and really don’t need an Intel NUC D34010WYKH

This is my tech lust. I desire this consumer object like non-technical people crave the most recent iphone model. I have perfectly serviceable server hardware but it leaves me cold. I want something that I can get excited about. This is an Intel NUC D34010WYKH and it’s small, fast, power efficient, expandable and sexy. Throwing away old hardware and putting this in its stead will surely make my (digital) life complete.

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MUAMSAMTAMDAMAAAAAA! Understanding how email works so you can get on with setting up your own mail server

‘Email infrastructure’ is a word most people never want to hear. And with good reason. The elements and procedures involved in getting email from user A to user B are legion and complex. And that’s just the theory before you even start to get into the practical implementation side of things. However, understanding the theory will make a more practical how-to (like this one for Arch Linux) easier to follow.

This article will offer an introduction to that theory. There are plenty of ressources to draw on, so mostly this is simply a meta article with links to the best of the internet on the various sub-topics with a bit of filler where needed. The aim is not give an in-depth understanding of how, say, SMTP works. The aim is to provide the wanna-be master of his own email domain the minimum of theoretical grounding to accomplish that goal.

Note: This introduction assumes you know what terms like server, client, protocol, and ports mean. At least roughly. Ideally you have some experience setting up other services for network use, such as a web server.

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